Mercury Policy Project

Promoting policies to eliminate mercury use and reduce mercury exposure

Archive for December, 2009

Global Warming Linked to Increased Mercury Contamination in Polar Bears

December 23rd, 2009 by kris

Climate change may be magnifying the mercury content of the polar bears’ diet.  A recently study, “Stable Isotope Food-web Analysis and Mercury Biomagnification in Polar Bears” shows that polar bears eat from two distinct food webs, one the ice algae-based web and the other  ocean’s phytoplankton-based food web.   As climate change shrinks the polar ice, polar bears face increased dependency on their other food source, the mercury-laden marine fish and animals.

Category: Fish and Seafood, Kid Stuff, Mercury Exposure, Reports | Comments Off

Special Screening of The Cove to Showcase “Mercury Rising” Bonus Feature

December 14th, 2009 by kris

Concord, New Hampshire

Green Concord is hosting a post-film discussion panel and screening of The Cove at 7pm, Monday, Dec. 14, at Red River Theatres with MPP and other specialists who will speak about the specific issues in The Cove and be available for questions and answers. After the main viewing, MPP will show a segment of the bonus feature “Mercury Rising” that explores the dangers of mercury contamination as it affects society and the global environment. Mercury Policy Project and GotMercury recently introduced the new Cove-GotMercury mercury-in-fish calculator that allows people to check mercury exposure from fish on-line or from a cell phone based on their weight, fish type and serving size.

Category: Events, Fish and Seafood, International, Mercury Exposure, Press Releases | Comments Off

Seeking Environmental Justice

December 10th, 2009 by kris

New York, NY

The Council of Organizations, a Division of the United Nations Association of the USA, planned a Human Rights Day conference focusing on mercury as a case study from a human rights perspective. MPP’s Director presented “The Global Mercury Crisis Disproportionally Threatens the World’s Most Vulnerable Populations.Inequities of mercury related illnesses fall disproportionately and most heavily on indigenous and coastal people around the world, especially those who make their living from subsistence fishing - so controlling mercury pollution is a human rights as well as environmental issue. For more information, see MPP’s paper, Seeking Environmental Justice.

Category: Developing World, Events, International, Mercury Exposure | Comments Off